Sign In | Support
Follow Engineering TV
   
Permalink:
Comments (6)
Add your comment
John Thorpe commented on November 01, 2012
March 8th 2012 Avec Corporation de-registered for not filing results since 2007 when it showed nearly $4m. loss. Looks like it's gone dormant again, shame as it's such a good idea.
Smoothjazz commented on October 19, 2012
I use to drive Ray Brouzes{Preside­nt} of Axial Vector when they were in NYC.. I haven't heard from them in quite a while.. not sure how the company is doing.. I actually have seen this engine run with my own two eyes.. They transport it around in a larger size suitcase.. it weighs about 60lbs.. I've actually been in a room and seen the reaction of an investor when they crank up the engine and there is basically no sound, and no emissions.. one investor stood up, pulled out a checkbook and threw it on the table and said, " i'm in how much." Ray and the guys at Axial Engine are real good guys with a product that's needed.. They've taken me to lunch at "Sparks Steakhouse"­; and other nice eateries around NYC.. I wish them well, it's a fantastic product and idea, and people should take a real good look at what the people at Axial Vector are trying to do.. This is the direction that the automotive industry needs to go!!
Monkeyron commented on September 16, 2012
Now 2 years later I cannot find where they went. I read somewhere the United Arab Emerates pick them up. Anyone know where they are today?
dbleser commented on January 21, 2012
Actually, the original motor was as said, by Blazer (Bleser Motors). It was built and ran in the mid 30's. Right s were sold to Herrmann before Grandpa died. Herrman built a cast iron model in early 40's. He wanted the "fame"­; trying to claim he invented it.
darrenpowell commented on August 15, 2011
Ummm ... dates back to 1955? ... try 1916 ... The story so far: the engine originates from a design by the Blazer brothers, who worked for Studebaker in 1916. They sold the rights to Karl Herrmann, Studebaker'­s head of engineering. He developed it over many years, taking out a patent in 1941; see US patent 2237989. The engne received FAA Type Certificate E-293 on Dec 31, 1981. By 1961 Herrmann was eighty years old, and sold everything to Dennis Palmer, one of his employees. At this point the Dyna-Cam name was attached to it. Eventually the engine was flown for seven hours in a Piper Arrow in 1987, but Dyna-Cam fell out with Piper in 1988, and things appear to have rested there until recently. The assets of the Dyna-Cam Engine Corp were acquired by the Axial Vector Engine Corporation in 2006. The engine now has a 92-year history. Good luck Axial Vector!
andy commented on October 09, 2010
truly great
Powered by Waywire.com Privacy Send Us Feedback